Posted in Thinking for Oneself, Unquantified fragments of numbers, Yours Truly

So Many Trifles and Too Much Time

All Rights Reserved © mmartel∞

 

Tower to endless tower,

dust per miss the light.

So Many Trifles and too much time…

we toil, we ravage

this the forage to arrive.

 

Arise.

 

The badge of high.

The lofts of significance,

’tis but an inessential plot to land

some pinnacle position.

But devices of desire,

naught are the wonders to belief.

Heed thyself amongst the autogenous plight.

 

Forget not…

the point is plunge.

 

 

Ewe,

a machine of desire

many are the trifles, barren time.

 

 

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Posted in Political Euphemisms, Thinking for Oneself, WWII, Yours Truly

Myths and Facts

Historical Revisionism

“Can The Truth Ever Be Truly Captured”?

 

For every “fact” there is a “myth” and for every “myth”, there is a “story” based in “fact”. Revisionism is the logical step towards the progression of upward thought, away from the constructs of “fact or myth.”  Whatever may be held as “truth” must be questioned relentlessly.  What is left are the words that continue a “story”and the notion that “reality” is no more “fact” then “myth”.  Time is the weight that the world must bear. Eternity is the “truth” that neither “fact” or “myth” can eradicate.

 

“Maintaining the hatreds and passions of the past prevents genuine reconciliation and lasting peace. The Auschwitz extermination story originated as World War II propaganda. And all wartime propaganda, unless hatred and passion are to have the final word, must be viewed critically. It is high time to take a more objective look at this highly polemicized chapter of history.”

http://www.ihr.org/leaflets/auschwitz.shtml

 

All Rights Reserved © mmartel∞

Posted in Thinking for Oneself, Uncategorized, Unquantified fragments of numbers, Yours Truly

Meditations: Piece I

 

IMG_0403

All Rights Reserved © mmartel∞

 

“It is with and without one, that the other finds the sum.  The two unbeknownst to me, rings truer in the dirge; its gradient death hidden within the blea. Beneath the tread to lot, beneath the tread to none…it is with and without the one, eternity naught in mediation to none.”

-MMartel

It is in the closest thoughts to the one, that one reaches a true uncovering.  To meditate in and under the life…is to pass through that which holds still.  It is in these peculiar moments in the between, where the recognizance of existence yields the verboten pome.  The answer which leads to a question, a posit held in place.  A disregard for that which one stands in front of and understands from behind.

To meditate is to see that what applies to the sum, applies to none.  Yet, it is through the sum of understanding, that which applies to none abounded becomes the sum. To meditate is to catch a momentary motion, above and through the apex that eternally sums the mount.

Whom is he which mediates in the path that enters to nothingness.  Whom is he which meditates, on the alive and the sum which breathes sustenance to form.  Whom is he which mediates, on the path of narrowest fit.  He whom grasps the hand of life, he whom grasps no nearer to the hand of passing…the bridge of meditation, the nexus evermore.

No man in exception, understands within and without.  He meditates in that which breathes life-force, to reach from point to point.  And in this in-between, the straight and narrow, he finds that which may escape him in this life.  Only, then do his thoughts become a mediation and the life-breath yields its force.

This be the life-breath, the meditations of John Donne…

 

Actio Laesa. The  strength,  and  the  function
of the Senses, and other faculties
change and faile.                         
II. MEDITATION 

THE Heavens are not the less constant, because they move continually, because they move continually one and the same way. The Earth is not the more constant, because it lyes stil continually, because continually it changes, and melts in al parts thereof. Man, who is the noblest part of the Earth, melts so away, as if he were a statue, not ofEarth, but of Snowe. We see his owne Envie melts him, he growes leane with that; he will say, anothers beautie melts him; but he feeles that a Fever doth not melt him likesnow, but powr him out like lead, like iron, like brasse melted in a furnace: It doth not only melt him, but calcine him, reduce him to Atomes, and to ashes; not to water, but to lime. And how quickly? Sooner than thou canst receive an answer, sooner than thou canst conceive the question; Earth is the center of my Bodie, Heaven is thecenter of my Soule; these two are the naturall places of those two; but those goe not to these two in an equall pace: My body falls downe without pushing, my Soule does not go up without pulling: Ascension is my Soules pace and measure, butprecipitation my bodies: And, even Angells, whose home is Heaven, and who are winged too, yet had a Ladder to goe to Heaven, by steps. The Sunne who goes so many miles in a minut, the Starres of the Firmament, which go so very many more, goe not so fast, as my body to the earth. In the same instant that I feele the first attempt of the disease, I feele the victory; In the twinckling of an eye, I can scarse see, instantly the tast is insipid, and fatuous; instantly the appetite is dull and desirelesse: instantly the knees are sinking and strengthlesse; and in an instant, sleepe, which is thepicture, the copie of death, is taken away, that the Originall, Death it selfe may succeed, and that so I might have death to the life. It was part of Adams punishment,In the sweat of thy browes thou shalt eate thy bread: it is multiplied to me, I have earned bread in the sweat of my browes, in the labor of my calling, and I have it; and I sweat againe, and againe, from the brow, to the sole of the foot, but I eat no bread, I tast no sustenance: Miserable distribution of Mankind, where one halfe lackes meat, and the other stomacke.


Source :
Donne, John. The Complete Poetry and Selected Prose of John Donne.
Charles M. Coffin, Ed. New York: Modern Library, 1952. 416-417.

 

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Posted in Colloquial Euphemisms, Правда (NO not that one), Historical Perspective, Insight Videos, Political Euphemisms, Thinking for Oneself

The Hitler Speech They Don’t Want You to Hear

Once and again…historical revisionism is,  simply put:

A logical inference which only strengthens the nascent and growing seed that leads to finding some kind of truth in form. 

Don’t claim you know, or understand whence you have not even taken the valuable time to hear many angles and test them under the strong hand of fact and logic.

 

 

I always found it funny how we saw 10 second clips of Hitler’s speeches in German at school but were never allowed to read the translations. Literally, not once. We’ve all seen the same angry German stereotype clip a hundred times, but does anyone know what he was talking about? Is that not propaganda? He […]

via Video: The Hitler speech nobody is allowed to discuss — Philosophies of a Disenchanted Scholar

Posted in Political Euphemisms, Self-sufficiency, Sociobiology, Thinking for Oneself, Yours Truly

“If everything on earth were rational, nothing would ever happen.” …So much for politics…

 

ted

“Intellectualism is a sort of psychological disorder whose main symptom is an inability to combine one’s intellectualizing with the work of one’s emotional and physical centers. The result is a hollow being who uses big words and fancy concepts to camouflage a profound fecklessness. We can only be whole beings if we find ways to combine the work of our three centers—intellectual, emotional and physical—in a harmonious way. Ignore any one of them, and what you have is a slightly crippled being; ignore two, and what you have is an invalid.”

“The conservatives are fools: they whine about the decay of traditional values, yet they enthusiastically support technological progress and economic growth. Apparently it never occurs to them that you can’t make rapid, drastic changes in the technology and the economy of a society without causing rapid changes in all other aspects of the society as well, and that such rapid changes inevitably break down traditional values.”

“Ted didn’t say it, but I will: both ends of the political spectrum, and all points in between, are merely projections of the technosphere. The political parties are social machines, and different mechanized political tasks call for different kinds of machinery.”

 

Please continue reading this brilliant article and blog (comment sections are great as well):

http://cluborlov.blogspot.co.uk/2016/03/so-much-for-politics.html#more

 

…and whilst you are at it…a bit of historical revisionism is in check for the “Mr. Ted”.  Don’t just gobble up the news turkey-heads…there is more than can only be encountered on a shiny, hand-fed surface. Inform yourself before you can even begin to wrap your head around any kind of truth. Hunt for the lot… your brain is niente(anything and nothing). The truth may one day grace you with its beautiful appearance, but it will be far too late to undo your laziness. :

http://editions-hache.com/essais/pdf/kaczynski2.pdf

http://theanarchistlibrary.org/category/author/ted-kaczynski

Posted in Language, Music, Thinking for Oneself, Yours Truly

Thinking for Oneself: Final Piece; Piece IV

In the realm of reality, however fair, happy, and pleasant it may prove
to be, we always move controlled by the law of gravity, which we must be
unceasingly overcoming. While in the realm of thought we are disembodied
spirits, uncontrolled by the law of gravity and free from penury.

This is why there is no happiness on earth like that which at the
propitious moment a fine and fruitful mind finds in itself.

The presence of a thought is like the presence of our beloved. We
imagine we shall never forget this thought, and that this loved one
could never be indifferent to us. But out of sight out of mind! The
finest thought runs the risk of being irrevocably forgotten if it is not
written down, and the dear one of being forsaken if we do not marry her.


There are many thoughts which are valuable to the man who thinks them;
but out of them only a few which possess strength to produce either
repercussion or reflex action, that is, to win the reader’s sympathy
after they have been written down. It is what a man has thought out
directly _for himself_ that alone has true value. Thinkers may be
classed as follows: those who, in the first place, think for themselves,
and those who think directly for others. The former thinkers are the
genuine, _they think for themselves_ in both senses of the word; they
are the true _philosophers_; they alone are in earnest. Moreover, the
enjoyment and happiness of their existence consist in thinking. The
others are the _sophists_; they wish to _seem_, and seek their happiness
in what they hope to get from other people; their earnestness consists
in this. To which of these two classes a man belongs is soon seen by his
whole method and manner. Lichtenberg is an example of the first class,
while Herder obviously belongs to the second.

When one considers how great and how close to us the _problem of
existence_ is,–this equivocal, tormented, fleeting, dream-like
existence–so great and so close that as soon as one perceives it, it
overshadows and conceals all other problems and aims;–and when one sees
how all men–with a few and rare exceptions–are not clearly conscious
of the problem, nay, do not even seem to see it, but trouble themselves
about everything else rather than this, and live on taking thought only
for the present day and the scarcely longer span of their own personal
future, while they either expressly give the problem up or are ready to
agree with it, by the aid of some system of popular metaphysics, and are
satisfied with this;–when one, I say, reflects upon this, so may one be
of the opinion that man is a _thinking being_ only in a very remote
sense, and not feel any special surprise at any trait of thoughtlessness
or folly; but know, rather, that the intellectual outlook of the normal
man indeed surpasses that of the brute,–whose whole existence resembles
a continual present without any consciousness of the future or the
past–but, however, not to such an extent as one is wont to suppose.


And corresponding to this, we find in the conversation of most men that
their thoughts are cut up as small as chaff, making it impossible for
them to spin out the thread of their discourse to any length. If this
world were peopled by really thinking beings, noise of every kind would
not be so universally tolerated, as indeed the most horrible and aimless
form of it is.[12] If Nature had intended man to think she would not
have given him ears, or, at any rate, she would have furnished them with
air-tight flaps like the bat, which for this reason is to be envied.
But, in truth, man is like the rest, a poor animal, whose powers are
calculated only to maintain him during his existence; therefore he
requires to have his ears always open to announce of themselves, by
night as by day, the approach of the pursuer.

 

Side note:

There is something to be admired at a width of wisdom, no matter the person, the place ….the soul that floats from realm to realm,

in that which is inherently part of the human who chooses to constantly live with the burden and lightness of thinking for themselves.

To live in this skin…with this knowledge, in this existence is one of the ultimate forms of courage against the illusions that ultimately destroy the very being of purity, beauty and truth that is likely to escape most.

Thinking for oneself; these are not mere acts against untruths…they are the clearest uncovering of paths to reaching the very depths of true existence and reaching the very souls which become displaced living amongst the filth of the rot alive.

All pieces of Thinking for Oneself are directly extracted out of the brilliant mind of Schopenhauer.  He is due all the credit.

Let it be known that most will read such people as Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Plato, Kierkegaard and many of the great minds that have attempted to write veracity in form.  The words will be read, the thoughts will be thought and the supposed actions taken to life.

Yet, it is with no certain doubt that most humans cannot grasp the severity of such words. Not through reading, or thoughts and less through action.  Many will pass over such wisdom until the moment when they look at death, see their souls at their bedsides and wonder at such a distance…why true existence never gazed upon them until that very moment.

It is at a distance of perplex…when one truly begins to realize the extent of thinking for themselves.  What the weight of these actions to act…meaning, in the fibers to exist. The threads of lifeblood.

The cost of watching the world at a distance, its illusions and magic.  The cost of creating distortions of the self, to the self ,for the self ….for the sacrifice of reaching the all too distant grasp, that of factualism, truth; precision to thread the fibers of the soul.

The undying fortitude to truly breathe in one’s own mind fibers and think for oneself.

 

 

All Rights Reserved © mmartel∞

 

Posted in Language, Music, Thinking for Oneself

Thinking for Oneself: Piece III

 

 

The man who thinks for himself learns the authorities for his opinions
only later on, when they serve merely to strengthen both them and
himself; while the book-philosopher starts from the authorities and
other people’s opinions, therefrom constructing a whole for himself; so
that he resembles an automaton, whose composition we do not understand.
The other man, the man who thinks for himself, on the other hand, is
like a living man as made by nature. His mind is impregnated from
without, which then bears and brings forth its child. Truth that has
been merely learned adheres to us like an artificial limb, a false
tooth, a waxen nose, or at best like one made out of another’s flesh;
truth which is acquired by thinking for oneself is like a natural
member: it alone really belongs to us. Here we touch upon the difference
between the thinking man and the mere man of learning. Therefore the
intellectual acquirements of the man who thinks for himself are like a
fine painting that stands out full of life, that has its light and shade
correct, the tone sustained, and perfect harmony of colour. The
intellectual attainments of the merely learned man, on the contrary,
resemble a big palette covered with every colour, at most systematically
arranged, but without harmony, relation, and meaning.

 

Mere experience can as little as reading take the place of thought. Mere
empiricism bears the same relation to thinking as eating to digestion
and assimilation. When experience boasts that it alone, by its
discoveries, has advanced human knowledge, it is as though the mouth
boasted that it was its work alone to maintain the body.

The works of all really capable minds are distinguished from all other
works by a character of decision and definiteness, and, in consequence,
of lucidity and clearness. This is because minds like these know
definitely and clearly what they wish to express–whether it be in
prose, in verse, or in music. Other minds are wanting in this decision
and clearness, and therefore may be instantly recognised.

The characteristic sign of a mind of the highest standard is the
directness of its judgment. Everything it utters is the result of
thinking for itself; this is shown everywhere in the way it gives
expression to its thoughts. Therefore it is, like a prince, an imperial
director in the realm of intellect. All other minds are mere delegates,
as may be seen by their style, which has no stamp of its own.

Hence every true thinker for himself is so far like a monarch; he is
absolute, and recognises nobody above him. His judgments, like the
decrees of a monarch, spring from his own sovereign power and proceed
directly from himself. He takes as little notice of authority as a
monarch does of a command; nothing is valid unless he has himself
authorised it. On the other hand, those of vulgar minds, who are swayed
by all kinds of current opinions, authorities, and prejudices, are like
the people which in silence obey the law and commands.

 

…More to come in Piece IV

Posted in Language, Music, Thinking for Oneself

Thinking for Oneself: Piece II

 

 

The man who thinks for himself learns the authorities for his opinions
only later on, when they serve merely to strengthen both them and
himself; while the book-philosopher starts from the authorities and
other people’s opinions, therefrom constructing a whole for himself; so
that he resembles an automaton, whose composition we do not understand.
The other man, the man who thinks for himself, on the other hand, is
like a living man as made by nature. His mind is impregnated from
without, which then bears and brings forth its child. Truth that has
been merely learned adheres to us like an artificial limb, a false
tooth, a waxen nose, or at best like one made out of another’s flesh;
truth which is acquired by thinking for oneself is like a natural
member: it alone really belongs to us. Here we touch upon the difference
between the thinking man and the mere man of learning. Therefore the
intellectual acquirements of the man who thinks for himself are like a
fine painting that stands out full of life, that has its light and shade
correct, the tone sustained, and perfect harmony of colour. The
intellectual attainments of the merely learned man, on the contrary,
resemble a big palette covered with every colour, at most systematically
arranged, but without harmony, relation, and meaning.

 

Mere experience can as little as reading take the place of thought. Mere
empiricism bears the same relation to thinking as eating to digestion
and assimilation. When experience boasts that it alone, by its
discoveries, has advanced human knowledge, it is as though the mouth
boasted that it was its work alone to maintain the body.

The works of all really capable minds are distinguished from all other
works by a character of decision and definiteness, and, in consequence,
of lucidity and clearness. This is because minds like these know
definitely and clearly what they wish to express–whether it be in
prose, in verse, or in music. Other minds are wanting in this decision
and clearness, and therefore may be instantly recognised.

The characteristic sign of a mind of the highest standard is the
directness of its judgment. Everything it utters is the result of
thinking for itself; this is shown everywhere in the way it gives
expression to its thoughts. Therefore it is, like a prince, an imperial
director in the realm of intellect. All other minds are mere delegates,
as may be seen by their style, which has no stamp of its own.

Hence every true thinker for himself is so far like a monarch; he is
absolute, and recognises nobody above him. His judgments, like the
decrees of a monarch, spring from his own sovereign power and proceed
directly from himself. He takes as little notice of authority as a
monarch does of a command; nothing is valid unless he has himself
authorised it. On the other hand, those of vulgar minds, who are swayed
by all kinds of current opinions, authorities, and prejudices, are like
the people which in silence obey the law and commands.

In the realm of reality, however fair, happy, and pleasant it may prove
to be, we always move controlled by the law of gravity, which we must be
unceasingly overcoming. While in the realm of thought we are disembodied
spirits, uncontrolled by the law of gravity and free from penury.

This is why there is no happiness on earth like that which at the
propitious moment a fine and fruitful mind finds in itself.

 

…More to Come in Piece III

Posted in Language, Music, Thinking for Oneself

Thinking For Oneself: Piece I

THINKING FOR ONESELF.

The largest library in disorder is not so useful as a smaller but
orderly one; in the same way the greatest amount of knowledge, if it has
not been worked out in one’s own mind, is of less value than a much
smaller amount that has been fully considered. For it is only when a man
combines what he knows from all sides, and compares one truth with
another, that he completely realizes his own knowledge and gets it into
his power. A man can only think over what he knows, therefore he should
learn something; but a man only knows what he has pondered.

A man can apply himself of his own free will to reading and learning,
while he cannot to thinking. Thinking must be kindled like a fire by a
draught and sustained by some kind of interest in the subject. This
interest may be either of a purely objective nature or it may be merely
subjective. The latter exists in matters concerning us personally, but
objective interest is only to be found in heads that think by nature,
and to whom thinking is as natural as breathing; but they are very rare.
This is why there is so little of it in most men of learning.

The difference between the effect that thinking for oneself and that
reading has on the mind is incredibly great; hence it is continually
developing that original difference in minds which induces one man to
think and another to read. Reading forces thoughts upon the mind which
are as foreign and heterogeneous to the bent and mood in which it may be
for the moment, as the seal is to the wax on which it stamps its
imprint. The mind thus suffers total compulsion from without; it has
first this and first that to think about, for which it has at the time
neither instinct nor liking.

On the other hand, when a man thinks for himself he follows his own
impulse, which either his external surroundings or some kind of
recollection has determined at the moment. His visible surroundings do
not leave upon his mind _one_ single definite thought as reading does,
but merely supply him with material and occasion to think over what is
in keeping with his nature and present mood. This is why _much_ reading
robs the mind of all elasticity; it is like keeping a spring under a
continuous, heavy weight. If a man does not want to think, the safest
plan is to take up a book directly he has a spare moment.

This practice accounts for the fact that learning makes most men more
stupid and foolish than they are by nature, and prevents their writings
from being a success; they remain, as Pope has said,

“For ever reading, never to be read.”

 

Reading is merely a substitute for one’s own thoughts. A man allows his
thoughts to be put into leading-strings.

Further, many books serve only to show how many wrong paths there are,
and how widely a man may stray if he allows himself to be led by them.
But he who is guided by his genius, that is to say, he who thinks for
himself, who thinks voluntarily and rightly, possesses the compass
wherewith to find the right course. A man, therefore, should only read
when the source of his own thoughts stagnates; which is often the case
with the best of minds.

It is sin against the Holy Spirit to frighten away one’s own original
thoughts by taking up a book. It is the same as a man flying from Nature
to look at a museum of dried plants, or to study a beautiful landscape
in copperplate. A man at times arrives at a truth or an idea after
spending much time in thinking it out for himself, linking together his
various thoughts, when he might have found the same thing in a book; it
is a hundred times more valuable if he has acquired it by thinking it
out for himself. For it is only by his thinking it out for himself that
it enters as an integral part, as a living member into the whole system
of his thought, and stands in complete and firm relation with it; that
it is fundamentally understood with all its consequences, and carries
the colour, the shade, the impress of his own way of thinking; and comes
at the very moment, just as the necessity for it is felt, and stands
fast and cannot be forgotten. This is the perfect application, nay,
interpretation of Goethe’s

“Was du ererbt von deinen Vaetern hast
Erwirb es um es zu besitzen.”

 

…More to come in Piece II